Stormwater Management Master Plan

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The Town of Halton Hills recently completed the Stormwater Management (SWM) Strategy which has led to the Town undertaking a Stormwater Management Master Plan.

As the Town grows, the way in which precipitation run-off can move through the landscape becomes more important and challenging. Stormwater systems exist throughout our community to maneuver rainfall and other collected water to collection basins and away from our residences.

Over time, there have been many changes and advances in the progression of SWM practices to address both minor and major drainage systems. The Town will be evaluating the existing SWM system and making recommendations to bring the storm infrastructure up-to-date to prepare for the anticipated impacts of climate change.

There have been an increasing number of locally extreme rainfall events with much higher intensities than those seen in the past, earlier snowmelt, and increased flood risks which pose challenges to the existing infrastructure.

The Town is seeking input from the public and key stakeholders to help guide the SWM Master Plan.

The Town of Halton Hills recently completed the Stormwater Management (SWM) Strategy which has led to the Town undertaking a Stormwater Management Master Plan.

As the Town grows, the way in which precipitation run-off can move through the landscape becomes more important and challenging. Stormwater systems exist throughout our community to maneuver rainfall and other collected water to collection basins and away from our residences.

Over time, there have been many changes and advances in the progression of SWM practices to address both minor and major drainage systems. The Town will be evaluating the existing SWM system and making recommendations to bring the storm infrastructure up-to-date to prepare for the anticipated impacts of climate change.

There have been an increasing number of locally extreme rainfall events with much higher intensities than those seen in the past, earlier snowmelt, and increased flood risks which pose challenges to the existing infrastructure.

The Town is seeking input from the public and key stakeholders to help guide the SWM Master Plan.

Ask the Town

Please ask us any questions relating to the Town's approach and objectives for stormwater management, the Stormwater Master Plan, or let us know how stormwater affects you.

Questions will be answered within 10 business days.


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    1 With increasing temperatures and extended summer periods with low rainfall, SWM Ponds can become breeding grounds for mosquitos. An effective way to offset such problems is with an aeration system. Will the Master Plan consider requiring this in new ponds and retrofitting for existing ponds? 2) SWM Ponds are only effective if the surrounding area is appropriately graded to direct surface water flows to the Pond. Will the Master Plan ensure that applications for new ponds are reviewed to ensure this is accomplished?

    Don Robinson asked about 2 months ago

    By nature, any small or large amount of standing water will attract living creatures including mosquitoes. With the installation of 'wet' Stormwater Management (SWM) ponds - that is, SWM ponds with a permanent pool of water - a new localized water environment is created. This is a result of the flood protection provided to the public by this important infrastructure.

    Since the prime function of a SWM pond is to protect the public by mitigating flooding, any modifications to its design should be reviewed from a functional perspective. In this case, the question of potential nuisance should be weighed against impacts to the pond's performance as well as ongoing operation and maintenance cost. However, Town staff will discuss during the Master Plan and review approaches taken by neighboring municipalities to explore your suggestion. 

    With respect to your second question, thank you for the observation. It is correct, and the review of grading plans go hand in hand with the review of SWM pond designs. This is one of the important tasks the Development Engineering Department of the Town undertakes to ensure efficiency and functionality of the Town’s infrastructure. Safety of the public is also a foremost consideration during review. 


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    Is there promotion of semi permeable paving, Rain Gardens, disconnecting downspouts, alternatives to the old technology of Storm water ponds?

    Cindy Cinerdella asked 2 months ago

    Stormwater Management Ponds are installed to provide flood protection to areas downstream of new development. The ponds provide storage for the excessive runoff which would otherwise flood streets and basements. Current industry trends look to futher increase the size of stormwater management ponds to enhance this protection. 

    Unfortunately, semi-permeable paving, rain gardens, downspout disonnection, and other Low Impact Development (LID) features have limited ability to provide protection from flooding during high intensity rain events. Accordingly, stormwater management ponds will likely stay in the landscape.

    Nonetheless, the Town is committed to implementation of LID features where feasible and appropriate in alignment with the Town's strategies for climate change, sustainability, and resilient infrastructure. The Stormwater Master Plan will explore typical approaches for use of LIDs and green infrastructure within the Town’s right-of-ways. Specific technologies and opportunities for implementation will be developed during the detailed design of future projects.